Confederate History and Heritage: Wellington Goddin of Richmond, Virginia receives his pardon from President Andrew Johnson

(Image courtesy of Ancestry.com)




On April 12, 1865, Wellington Goddin of Richmond, Virginia took his first, of two Oaths of Allegiance to the United States of America. Odd, especially so for a man who had wholeheartedly supported the Confederacy throughout the entirety of the war. The oath sworn to by Goddin was as prescribed in President Abraham Lincoln's Amnesty Proclamation of 1863. Lincoln had been assassinated by John Wilkes Booth at Ford's Theater only two weeks prior to Goddin taking his first Oath of Allegiance. There can be little doubt that Goddin saw the writing on the wall. The Confederacy now in shambles and President Lincoln assassinated, this total piece of garbage and disgusting economic opportunist knew that he needed to act fast, lest he be found to be the traitor that he was by the very Union he despised. Unbelievably, on May 10, 1865, just one month after taking his first oath, and the fall of Richmond, Goddin was part of a group of financial vultures who quickly swooped in to pick the bones of Richmond's remaining citizens in the wake of the Confederacy's hasty retreat, and opened the First National Bank of Richmond. Said to be among Goddin's first customers was traitor Robert E. Lee, how fitting.





(Image courtesy of Newspapers.com)




That same summer, Goddin once again took an Oath of Allegiance, this time as prescribed in Abraham Lincoln's successors Amnesty Proclamation of 1865. Goddin petitioned for amnesty from President Andrew Johnson in a letter dated June 12, 1865. Goddin you see, was a "businessman", perhaps one of the most influential in Richmond at the time. Goddin had his hands in a little bit of everything, and the dirty little secret is that he was personally, financially reliant on receiving a full pardon. This selfish piece of Confederate trash had no intention of preserving or protecting the Constitution, he just didn't want his comfortable lifestyle to be in danger. He would have just as soon pissed on that document. So Goddin, like many other ex-Confederates, choked down his pride and went before the Office of Provost Marshall once more, and on June 28, 1865, he took his second Oath of Allegiance.





(Image courtesy of Ancestry.com)





Unfortunately for America, President Johnson agreed to grant this pathetic coward his full pardon, and on July 13, 1865, Wellington Goddin was restored as a full United States citizen, enjoying all the same rights and liberties as any other average citizen. Personally, I think granting these traitors amnesty was the biggest mistake the Union ever made. These cowardly Confederates did not then, and still do not have any love for our country. It is regrettable that the Union let them off the hook so easily. I believe that these Confederates and their descendants were emboldened by the Union's foolish decision not to aggressively punish these traitors. The legacy of pathetic Confederates like Wellington Goddin has been borne out in the modern day joke that is the Confederate Heritage movement






Restoring the honor!






Comments

  1. They showed time and again it wasn't about "freedom".

    ReplyDelete
  2. Ever notice how Connie does not take on the blog posts that deal with actual history...like this one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We're not done with ol' Wellington yet.

      Delete
    2. Corey, I'm not interested in the use of history to spew hate.

      Delete

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