Virginia Flaggers promote White Nationalist hate rally in Richmond, Virginia on September 19th

Wayne Jones of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and Susan Hathaway of the Virginia Flaggers at a rally in Stuart, Virginia. (Image courtesy of Facebook under the doctrine of Fair Use for criticism and news reporting.)



Susan Hathaway, the leader of the Virginia Flaggers was able to score yet another media puff piece following a rally in Stuart, Virginia organized by Wayne Jones of the Sons of Confederate Veterans.



The Virginia Flaggers want you to believe that this is what 200 people looks like. I think they are off by a few... (Image courtesy of Facebook under the doctrine of Fair Use for criticism and news reporting.)



The Flaggers were claiming that there were approximately 200 people sympathetic to their message of hate at the Stuart rally, though media reports state that there were only around 75 people in attendance. Oops!



Virginia Flaggers Facebook post claiming 200 people attended a rally in Stuart, Virginia. (Image courtesy of Facebook)




According to the Martinsville Bulletin:


"The rally, organized by J.E.B. Stuart re-enactor Wayne Jones and Susan Hathaway, founder of the Virginia Flaggers, took place in front of the Patrick County Courthouse. About 75 people attended the rally, the majority carrying Confederate battle flags.
In addition to Jones, who is from North Augusta, S.C., and Hathaway, who is from Sandston, the Rev. Dr. Herman White of High Point, N.C. also spoke at the event."



Hathaway has been devoting most of her air time trying to paint her movement of code White Nationalists as eternal victims


"In Hathaway’s opinion, she said, the majority of African-Americans are not offended by the Confederate flag and those who attack the flag do so not out of “a false sense of making things right,” but rather for political reasons.
If someone legitimately is offended by the flag, Hathaway said, her response would depend on their approach.
“We obviously have some people come up and scream and yell and swear,” she said. “To those folks, we only react with, ‘God bless you, have a good day.’ For somebody that’s really interested in a conversation, I would absolutely say, ‘I can respect that, let’s talk about the history so maybe I can explain why I’m carrying (the flag).’”
At times, Hathaway said, the Virginia Flaggers have experienced a great deal of angry pushback.
“We’re raised to be good Christian folks, but that doesn’t mean you have to let people walk all over you,” she said. “I just got back from D.C., and we were pretty much attacked by some really violent folks, and it really made me understand the difference between us and them. … We’re not out here to be in anybody’s face and hurt their feelings. But at the same time, we feel like we’ve got to stop hiding our flags.”"



The media has completely ignored Hathaway's groups many connections to a White Nationalist hate group, the League of the South. The media has also ignored the racist beliefs of her groups own members, such as the views of Hubert Wayne Cash, who's property is host to one of Hathaway's flags. Cash believes that "Blacks are a worthless bunch of freeloading, dangerous, animals that should be put down like the dogs they are", a statement that neither Hathaway, nor her group has either addressed or distanced themselves from. And Hathaway's group is now at it again, promoting a White Nationalist rally in Richmond, Virginia on September 19th.




The Virginia Flaggers do their part to promote a hate rally being organized by a White Nationalist named Dennis Durham scheduled for September 19, 2015 in Richmond, Virginia. (Image courtesy of Facebook)



Hathaway's group briefly posted an advertisement for a White Nationalist rally to be held in Richmond, Virginia on September 19th. The rally is being organized by White Nationalist Dennis Durham, a member of a designated hate group, the League of the South. The Virginia Flaggers pulled the post down not long after it went up, but we saved you a copy so that no one can ever forget how her group works to do their part for White Nationalism. It is interesting to note that Hathaway's group had no problem posting the advertisement which asks anyone planning to attend the rally NOT to bring any US Flags. That is because the League of the South is deeply Anti-American.




White Nationalist hate group member Dennis Durham shares a flyer for his upcoming hate rally in Richmond, Virginia. (Image courtesy of Facebook)



Durham has been spearheading White Nationalist hate rallies disguised as Confederate Heritage events for several months in and around the Northern Virginia area. Recently, Durham was seen passing out hate propaganda produced by the League of the South in Washington, DC at an event that Virginia Flagger leader Susan Hathaway was coincidentally speaking at. The DC event was billed as a "Heritage Not Hate" type event with many of the speakers claiming as much, as well.




Hate group member Dennis Durham (in black t-shirt) stands behind Washington, DC rally speaker Susan Hathaway (seated in red) with a Southern Nationalist hate group flag, while Virginia Flagger and hate group defender Gregory Randall looks on. 



The Virginia Flaggers and the White Nationalists do their best to try and not address the constant overlap of their membership at events and the fact that the Virginia Flaggers have more or less morphed into White Nationalists themselves. When asked by the co-organizer of the White Nationalist rally Jason Sulser if the Virginia Flaggers plan to attend the hate rally, Hathaway assures Sulser that she's "Sure some will join you". That's good to know.



(Image courtesy of Facebook)




The Virginia Flaggers refuse to distance themselves from White Nationalism at all costs and many of their members spout off White Nationalist talking points on a regular basis such as Keith D. Holyfield. Holyfield is proud to be a Virginia Flagger.




(Image courtesy of Facebook)


And even though Keith is a Virginia Flagger above all else, that doesn't mean that he doesn't have special place in his heart for a bunch of LOSers.



Keith D Holyfield thanks the League of the South for adding him to their Closed Facebook group. (Image courtesy of Facebook)




But Keith has lots and lots of friends. Amongst them, not surprisingly, are Connie Chastain, Susan Hathaway and Dennis Durham. Looks like the gangs all here, how special.



(Image courtesy of Facebook)



Keith is always ruminating about things like "Cultural Genocide", an oft-cited buzzword of White Nationalists and Confederate Heritage types alike.



(Image courtesy of Facebook)




And Keith is a big fan of those, how did Connie put it, non-credible threats? Aren't all threats technically non-credible until someone follows through on them?




A video clearly depicting a criminal act, but not one that necessitates murder. Holyfield is
advocating Ku Klux Klan styled vigilante justice. (Image courtesy of Facebook)



Until Holyfield's Facebook page was either scrubbed completely or made invisible the other day, you could be treated to a litany of links and rants akin to what Dylann Roof says he felt necessitated him to allegedly murder nine innocent churchgoers. I think Holyfield has been hanging around Occidental Dissent too long. Oh yeah...



Keith Holyfield shares content from the White Nationalist hate blog Occidental Dissent. (Image courtesy of Facebook)






The header for a now deleted Facebook event for a planned hate rally in Richmond, Virginia. (Image courtesy of Facebook)



The rally in Richmond was originally titled the "Stop Southern Genocide" rally and was being co-organized by Dennis Durham, Jason Sulser and Jacqueline Ferris. All three have been instrumental in organizing the recent White Nationalist Confederate Heritage rallies in the Northern-ish Virginia area.




The three hosts of a White Nationalist hate rally scheduled for September 19, 2015 in Richmond, Virginia. (Image courtesy of Facebook)




Quite suddenly a few days ago, the Facebook event page for the rally was scrubbed by Ferris with no explanation given as to why.



Co-organizer Jacqueline Ferris cancels a Facebook event for a White Nationalist rally in Richmond, Virginia. (Image courtesy of Facebook)


Durham is also likely the admin for a new-ish Facebook page to track and promote the hate rallies he is organizing called "Central VA Confederate Flag Rallies".



Central VA Confederate Flag Rally page. (Image courtesy of Facebook)



The page has also become a clearinghouse for White Nationalist propaganda and links.




Link to a speech by the President of the White Nationalist hate group the League of the South asking "What would it take to get you to fight?" (Image courtesy of Facebook)



Link to a video of hate group President Michael Hill in which he does a half-assed job of explaining Southern White Nationalism. (Image courtesy of Facebook)


Oddly enough, Durham is also a member of a Closed Facebook group for "Confederate Flaggers". And who would ever believe that Susan Hathaway is an admin for the group?



(Image courtesy of Facebook)




(Image courtesy of Facebook)



(Image courtesy of Facebook)




Remember, it's about "Heritage Not Hate"!




Restoring the honor!




Comments

  1. Hate schmate. Yawn. Don't you ever get tired of slandering and libeling people? Do you do it because you get off on it, or does somebody pay you?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You do this quite often. You jump in and claim "slander" and "libel", yet you never can come up with just one example. I think we know why.

      Delete
  2. As the copyright holder of a number of the photos that you have posted as screenshots from Facebook, I request that you remove these images as I did not authorize their usage. Thank you for your prompt attention to this matter. Sincerely, Judy Smith, Judy Smith Photography

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    1. Ms. Smith. As I am sure you are well aware, the limited use of copyrighted material can be legally used without the permission of the copyright holder under the doctrine of Fair Use for purposes of criticism and news reporting, both of which I personally believe apply to the screenshots of the photographs you created and posted to social media. That being said, I am a reasonable person. I will comply with your kind request if you can tell me which photos you are referring to. Thanks very much. I look forward to helping you resolve this matter and will await your reply.

      Delete
    2. Source: http://copyright.gov/fair-use/more-info.html

      Fair use is a legal doctrine that promotes freedom of expression by permitting the unlicensed use of copyright-protected works in certain circumstances. Section 107 of the Copyright Act provides the statutory framework for determining whether something is a fair use and identifies certain types of uses—such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research—as examples of activities that may qualify as fair use. Section 107 calls for consideration of the following four factors in evaluating a question of fair use:
      (1) Purpose and character of the use, including whether the use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes: Courts look at how the party claiming fair use is using the copyrighted work, and are more likely to find that nonprofit educational and noncommercial uses are fair. This does not mean, however, that all nonprofit education and noncommercial uses are fair and all commercial uses are not fair; instead, courts will balance the purpose and character of the use against the other factors below. Additionally, “transformative” uses are more likely to be considered fair. Transformative uses are those that add something new, with a further purpose or different character, and do not substitute for the original use of the work.
      (2) Nature of the copyrighted work: This factor analyzes the degree to which the work that was used relates to copyright’s purpose of encouraging creative expression. Thus, using a more creative or imaginative work (such as a novel, movie, or song) is less likely to support a claim of a fair use than using a factual work (such as a technical article or news item). In addition, use of an unpublished work is less likely to be considered fair.
      (3) Amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole: Under this factor, courts look at both the quantity and quality of the copyrighted material that was used. If the use includes a large portion of the copyrighted work, fair use is less likely to be found; if the use employs only a small amount of copyrighted material, fair use is more likely. That said, some courts have found use of an entire work to be fair under certain circumstances. And in other contexts, using even a small amount of a copyrighted work was determined not to be fair because the selection was an important part—or the “heart”—of the work.
      (4) Effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work: Here, courts review whether, and to what extent, the unlicensed use harms the existing or future market for the copyright owner’s original work. In assessing this factor, courts consider whether the use is hurting the current market for the original work (for example, by displacing sales of the original) and/or whether the use could cause substantial harm if it were to become widespread.
      In addition to the above, other factors may also be considered by a court in weighing a fair use question, depending upon the circumstances. Courts evaluate fair use claims on a case-by-case basis, and the outcome of any given case depends on a fact-specific inquiry. This means that there is no formula to ensure that a predetermined percentage or amount of a work—or specific number of words, lines, pages, copies—may be used without permission.
      Please note that the Copyright Office is unable to provide specific legal advice to individual members of the public about questions of fair use. See 37 C.F.R. 201.2(a)(3).

      Delete
    3. Ms. Smith, do you know which pictures you'd like removed? I would like to comply with your wishes. Thank you kindly.

      Delete

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